Neurogenic properties and a clinical relevance of multipotent stem cells derived from cord blood samples stored in the biobanks

Marcin Jurga, Nico Forraz, Christina Basford, Gianluigi Atzeni, Andrew J. Trevelyan, Saba Habibollah, Hamad Mohamed Ali Yaseen, Simon A. Zwolinski, Colin P. McGuckin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several innovative therapies with human umbilical cord blood stem cells (SCs) are currently developing to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases. It has been shown that cord blood contains multipotent lineage-negative (LinNEG) SCs capable of neuronal differentiation. Clinically useful cord blood samples are stored in different biobanks worldwide, but the content and neurogenic properties of LinNEG cells are unknown. Here we have compared 5 major methods of blood processing: Sepax, Hetastarch, plasma depletion, Prepacyte-SC, and density gradient. We showed that Sepax-processed blood units contained 10-fold higher number of LinNEG cells after cryopreservation in comparison to all other methods. We showed in this study that multipotent SCs derived from fresh and frozen cord blood samples could be efficiently induced in defined serum-free medium toward neuronal progenitors (NF200+, Ki67+). During neuronal differentiation, the multipotent SCs underwent precise sequential changes at the molecular and cellular levels: Oct4 and Sox2 downregulation and Ngn1, NeuN, and PSD95 upregulation, similar to neurogenesis process in vivo. We expect that data presented here will be valuable for clinicians, researchers, biobanks, and patients and will contribute for better efficacy of future clinical trials in regeneration of CNS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)923-936
Number of pages14
JournalStem Cells and Development
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Apr 2012

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    Jurga, M., Forraz, N., Basford, C., Atzeni, G., Trevelyan, A. J., Habibollah, S., Mohamed Ali Yaseen, H., Zwolinski, S. A., & McGuckin, C. P. (2012). Neurogenic properties and a clinical relevance of multipotent stem cells derived from cord blood samples stored in the biobanks. Stem Cells and Development, 21(6), 923-936. https://doi.org/10.1089/scd.2011.0224