Predictive models to assess risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and comorbidity: Machine-learning algorithms and validation using national health data from Kuwait-a cohort study

Bassam Farran, Arshad Channanath, Kazem Behbehani, Alphonse Thangavel Thanaraj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We build classification models and risk assessment tools for diabetes, hypertension and comorbidity using machine-learning algorithms on data from Kuwait. We model the increased proneness in diabetic patients to develop hypertension and vice versa. We ascertain the importance of ethnicity (and natives vs expatriate migrants) and of using regional data in risk assessment. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Four machinelearning techniques were used: logistic regression, k-nearest neighbours (k-NN), multifactor dimensionality reduction and support vector machines. The study uses fivefold cross validation to obtain generalisation accuracies and errors. Setting: Kuwait Health Network (KHN) that integrates data from primary health centres and hospitals in Kuwait. Participants: 270 172 hospital visitors (of which, 89 858 are diabetic, 58 745 hypertensive and 30 522 comorbid) comprising Kuwaiti natives, Asian and Arab expatriates. Outcome measures: Incident type 2 diabetes, hypertension and comorbidity. Results: Classification accuracies of >85% (for diabetes) and >90% (for hypertension) are achieved using only simple non-laboratory-based parameters. Risk assessment tools based on k-NN classification models are able to assign 'high' risk to 75% of diabetic patients and to 94% of hypertensive patients. Only 5% of diabetic patients are seen assigned 'low' risk. Asian-specific models and assessments perform even better. Pathological conditions of diabetes in the general population or in hypertensive population and those of hypertension are modelled. Two-stage aggregate classification models and risk assessment tools, built combining both the component models on diabetes (or on hypertension), perform better than individual models. Conclusions: Data on diabetes, hypertension and comorbidity from the cosmopolitan State of Kuwait are available for the first time. This enabled us to apply four different case-control models to assess risks. These tools aid in the preliminary non-intrusive assessment of the population. Ethnicity is seen significant to the predictive models. Risk assessments need to be developed using regional data as we demonstrate the applicability of the American Diabetes Association online calculator on data from Kuwait.

Original languageEnglish
Article number002457
JournalBMJ Open
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Jun 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Predictive models to assess risk of type 2 diabetes, hypertension and comorbidity: Machine-learning algorithms and validation using national health data from Kuwait-a cohort study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this